About Adam Day

Adam Day is the publisher of IOP's nuclear, particle and gravitational physics titles. His background is mostly in publishing, working with the gravitational physics community. He also spent some time in the optics industry and holds an honours degree in physics from Glasgow University.

So long, and thanks for all the manuscripts

Adam Day

Adam Day is the Publisher of Classical and Quantum Gravity

Years ago, I sat, somewhat nervously, in a small, dimly lit room in an old office block. I’d applied for a dream job and I was expecting to learn the outcome of that application. A senior member of staff tactfully began the meeting with some friendly small-talk that did absolutely nothing to calm my nerves.

I’d heard of CQG – even before I’d seen the job advert. Reputed for its high standards of peer-review, it also held the distinction of being the first physics journal on the web. Clearly, this was a journal for brilliant pioneers and innovators (submit here) and I wanted to be part of that. Furthermore, I’d enjoyed studying relativity as an undergraduate and had hoped to become a gravitational-wave researcher, so the science of CQG was already close to my heart.  I can’t even remember the colour of the walls in that old office, but I can still hear the words “I’d like to offer you the job” very clearly.

Looking back Continue reading

Highlights of 2016 now free to read 

By Clifford Will.


Clifford Will

Clifford Will is the Editor-in-Chief of Classical and Quantum Gravity, Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of Florida, Chercheur Associé at the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, and James McDonnell Professor of Space Sciences Emeritus at Washington University in St. Louis.

I am delighted to present the CQG Highlights of 2016 which are now free to read.  This prestigious annual collection is selected by the editorial board and includes notable papers on gravitational waves, black holes, general relativity, cosmology, quantum gravity and more.

As well as being free to read on the web, each paper is promoted by the journal in a number of campaigns.  Watch for the CQG Highlights brochure at your next conference.

CQG Highlights remains one of CQG’s most popular promotions.  Don’t miss your chance to be included in CQG Highlights of 2017 by publishing your next great paper in CQG.

 

 

Continue reading

Happy new year!

By Clifford Will.


Clifford Will

Clifford Will is the Editor-in-Chief of Classical and Quantum Gravity, Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of Florida, Chercheur Associé at the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, and James McDonnell Professor of Space Sciences Emeritus at Washington University in St. Louis.

What a year for gravitational physics!  In February, the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations (LVC) announced the first detection of gravitational waves.  The MICROSCOPE satellite test of the equivalence principle took to the skies in April and, in June, LISA Pathfinder surpassed all expectations in demonstrating the key technologies required to detect gravitational waves in space.  As if all that wasn’t enough, the LVC announced a second detection of a binary black hole merger later that month.  By September, NASA revealed that it would rejoin ESA in funding the LISA mission with a view to launching a 3-armed space interferometer by 2030.  Could we have wished for more?

CQG launched a focus issue on the topic of gravitational waves in 2016 edited by Peter Shawhan and Deirdre Shoemaker.  You can submit your next great paper on gravitational waves to the issue which is currently open to submissions and will be promoted in a number of channels throughout 2017.  All submissions will be subject to CQG’s usual high standard of peer review.

To keep track of the latest CQG publications and news in 2017, you can follow the CQG+ blog or follow the journal on social media (Twitter, Facebook).

I want to express my appreciation to all CQG authors, referees and readers who supported the journal in 2016.  I particularly wish to thank the journal’s Editorial Board Members and Advisory Panel Members who assist in directing the strategy of the journal and who oversee CQG’s peer review.  I also welcome new Board and Panel members to CQG. I look forward to working with all of you in the coming year.

With the LIGO detectors’ second observation run underway, I am certain that we have more to look forward to in 2017. Continue reading

LIGO’s gravitational wave detection is Physics World 2016 Breakthrough of the Year

by Clifford M Will.


Physics World breakthrough of the year prize

The Physics World 2016 Breakthrough of the Year goes to the LIGO Scientific Collaboration for their revolutionary, first ever direct observations of gravitational waves.

Long awaited direct detection of Einstein’s gravitational-waves tops Physics World’s list of the 10 key breakthroughs in physics in 2016

It give me great pleasure to report that the LIGO Scientific Collaboration are to receive Physics World’s Breakthrough of the year award.  At the end of every year, the Physics World editorial team reveals what it believes to be the top 10 research breakthroughs for the past year and one of these is selected to be the Physics World Breakthrough of the year.

In recognition of this achievement, the Physics World team have created a short documentary movie with the assistance of members of the LIGO collaboration from Cardiff University.

The video features Samantha Usman, who recently wrote an excellent CQG+ entry about the discovery.
Continue reading

CQG+ Insight: Chiral Gravity

by Kirill Krasnov


Kirill Krasnov

Kirill Krasnov, Professor of Mathematical Physics, University of Nottingham. Pictured here visiting Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire

We seem to live in four space-time dimensions, and so should take the structures available in this number of dimensions seriously. One of these is chirality, see below for clarifications on my usage of this term. Related to chirality, there is a remarkable phenomenon occurring in General Relativity (GR) in four space-time dimensions. This phenomenon is so stunning that I would like to refer to it as the chiral miracle. It is well-known to experts. Still, even after almost 40 years after it had appeared in the literature, it has not become part of the background of all GR practitioners. I would like to use this CQG+ insight format to try to rectify this.

I start by reviewing the notion of chirality in four space-time dimensions. I then describe the “chiral miracle” that allows for chiral description(s) of gravity in Continue reading

Inspiral into Gargantua; where science meets science-fiction

Niels Warburton from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology shares an insight into his latest work with Sam Gralla and Scott Hughes published in Classical and Quantum Gravity.


Niels Warburton

Niels Warburton is a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow currently working at the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He works on calculating gravitational waveforms from the capture of compact objects by black holes ranging from hundreds to millions of solar masses. Outside of research he often encounters other types of waves on the waters around Boston where he is a keen sailor. Niels co-authored the article recently published in CQG with Sam Gralla of the University of Arizona and Scott Hughes at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The first merging black holes recently detected by LIGO were strange objects indeed. Torturing reality so that even light cannot escape from their interiors, as they whirled around each other at over half the speed of light, the disturbances they induced in space and time propagated outwards as gravitational waves. The measured characteristic chirp, an upsweep in frequency and amplitude of the waves, signaled that the two black holes had merged into a single, larger black hole. Amazingly, though this remnant was more than sixty times as massive as our sun it could be described by just two numbers – its mass and its spin. This is an unusual property for any macroscopic object as they usually require Continue reading

Crashing Neutron Stars on the Italian Dolomites

Bruno Giacomazzo, Andrea Endrizzi, Riccardo Ciolfi, Wolfgang Kastaun share details of their latest research published in the CQG focus issue: Rattle and shine: the signals from compact binary mergers.


Bruno Giacomazzo, Andrea Endrizzi, Riccardo Ciolfi, Wolfgang Kastaun

From left to right: Bruno Giacomazzo, Andrea Endrizzi, Riccardo Ciolfi, Wolfgang Kastaun.
About the authors: Bruno Giacomazzo is an assistant professor at the Department of Physics of the University of Trento and the Principal Investigator of the numerical relativity group there. The group is currently composed of two postdocs (Riccardo Ciolfi and Wolfgang Kastaun) and two PhD students (Andrea Endrizzi and Takumu Kawamura).

At the end of 2013, after seven years spent abroad (between Germany and the USA),  Bruno Giacomazzo came back to Italy for an assistant professor position at the University of Trento in Northern Italy. He used to come to this region when he was a kid to hike or ski on the mountains, but he never thought he would have come back here to study neutron star mergers.

Thanks to financial support from MIUR (Ministry of Education, University, and Research) he was able to attract Riccardo Ciolfi and Wolfgang Kastaun from abroad and to create with them the first numerical relativity group in this part of Italy. Thanks to Continue reading

Highlights of 2015

Clifford Will

Clifford Will is the Editor-in-Chief of Classical and Quantum Gravity

The latest CQG Highlights are now available to view.  These papers represent the most interesting and important work published in CQG in 2015.  They were selected by the CQG Editorial Board and approved at CQG’s recent annual board meeting in London.

This year marks a break from the process used in past years.  CQG Highlights used to be Continue reading

Focus issue on gravitational waves, now open for submissions

Peter Shawhan and Deirdre Shoemaker invite you to publish your next paper on gravitational waves in CQG’s new open focus issue on the topic.


Peter Shawhan

Peter Shawhan, University of Maryland

Sometimes things come together in unexpected, happy ways. At the CQG editorial board meeting in London last July, we discussed ideas for new focus issues and there was a consensus that the time was right to organize one on the general theme of gravitational waves. We could claim amazing prescience, but honestly we had no idea that Continue reading

The world we live in – #GR21

This is the second in a series of posts timed to coincide with the GR21 meeting. Keep an eye on CQG+ this week, for more posts on gravitational waves, the CQG Highlights and more.

Adam Day and the NYT building

Adam Day admiring the view from the top of the Rockefeller Center in NYC

I once had the experience of trying to find journal articles in an old bricks and mortar library. I spent a whole afternoon scouring a few thousand journal copies (and never did find what I was looking for). Information was scarce in those days and there were few ways to get it.

Watching scholarly communication develop since then has been interesting. In many ways, it’s now much easier to find papers – especially when you know exactly what you want to read. However, readers increasingly now find Continue reading